David Parker

The photographer David Parker, born in Stafford in England in 1949, originally started his professional career as an illustrator. Soon he developed a passion for large-format black and white photography. His landscapes are often determined by individual massive rocks, which dominate the entire picture due to their presence in an infinitely seeming space. The series 'New Desert Myths' shows monolithic rocks in desert landscapes. In this archaic, ancient landscape, stone and sand slowly transform under the influence of scorching sun and wind, thus forming the most bizarre geological formations. But human signs also appear hidden here in the form of petroglyphs that were worked into the stone by our ancestors thousands of years ago. For Parker, the latent, magical meaning of the symbols of human existence and culture made in the early Paleolithic era has a special appeal. Many of his pictures from the 'New Desert Myths' series were published in the illustrated book 'Myth and Landscape'. David Parker's works can be found in major collections worldwide

Works

  • David Parker
    New Desert Myth XXIX

    Signed, titled, dated and numbered on verso

    Giclée print

  • David Parker
    New Desert Myth XXIV
    2010

    Signed, titled, dated and numbered on verso

    Giclée print

    Ed. 1/10
  • David Parker
    New Desert Myth XXXIII
    2008

    Signed, titled, dated and numbered on verso

    Giclée print

    Ed. 1/10
  • David Parker
    New Desert Myth XXVIII
    2010

    Signed, titled, dated and numbered on verso

    Giclée print

    Ed. 1/10
  • David Parker
    New Desert Myth XIX
    2007

    Signed, titled, dated and numbered on verso

    Giclée print

    Ed. 1/10
  • David Parker
    New Desert Myth VIII
    1999

    Signed, titled, dated and numbered on verso

    Giclée print

    Ed. 1/10
  • David Parker
    New Desert Myth VII

    Signed, titled, dated and numbered on verso

    Giclée print

  • David Parker
    New Desert Myth V
    1999

    Signed, titled, dated and numbered on verso

    Giclée print

    Ed. 2/10

Exhibitions